ENTERPRISE CAR SHARE

ENTERPRISE CAR SHARE
10144 Page Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63132
(314) 506-4822
christy.minear@ehi.com
Car/Van Service, Transportation/Other

Service Area Includes:  With cars located throughout St. Louis, Enterprise CarShare is the perfect complement to the metro or bus for spending a day at Forest Park or running errands around town. Signing up today allows you to take advantage of all the freedoms of a car, without the costs of owning one, for low hourly and daily rates.

Availability:  7 Days a week

Hours:  24 Hours a day

Who Can Ride: Any member that has enrolled online

Type of Services:

Enterprise CarShare might be perfect for your business or organization if you:

  • Have two or more drivers
  • Need to streamline transportation and focus on core business
  • Need to improve predictability in service, cost, and fleet
  • Need to cuts costs on city and suburban car rental and taxis
  • Are adding to your social and environmental responsibility strategies on a meaningful scale
  • Are applying for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)

Many vehicle fleets—if their total monthly per-vehicle costs are divided by hours of actual use—cost upwards of $15 per hour to operate.

Faced with increased financial constraints, public agencies and private companies alike are looking closely at their fleets, and working with Enterprise CarShare to “right size” their fleets. Some find that it’s more economical to eliminate all of their in-house vehicles; others keep some vehicles, but sell off those with lower utilization, and use CarShare to fill the gaps.

Universities, hospitals, hotels, and corporate campuses are often located in dense urban areas where real estate is expensive and parking is scarce. Accommodating cars with new parking structures typically costs between $25,000 and $40,000 per space.

Enterprise CarShare works with several universities to reduce parking demand. This program has significantly decreased parking demand for a fraction of what it would have cost to increase the on-campus parking supply.